Book Review: Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

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Goodreads.com Synopsis:

Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Kat, her family, friends, and entire District 12.

My Thoughts:

This was the novel in which the rebellion truly begins and in which District 13 unloads its secrets. Mockingjay is about what I expected… as in previous books Katniss is caught up in a tidal wave of occurrences she cannot fully control; used by others; and lots of people die.

Katniss is not an ‘open book’ – she’s emotionally distant. Each successive book has piled more strain upon her, forcing her to compartmentalise and shut down parts of herself. Watching this happen isn’t pleasant in the slightest. It’s like a nearby car crash: riveting, depressing, painful to watch.

This final novel explains a lot of things. Why President Snow smells like blood and roses. What it was really like for previous victors in Panem. Where the peace keepers come from. Mockingjay was the payoff for this trilogy so it did its best to fulfil its potential AND fill in some of the gaps in the mythology – tying up loose ends wherever possible.

When you bring up the Hunger Games one of the first things most people mention is the ‘love’ triangle, but I think Mockingjay makes it startlingly clear that Katniss’ ties to these boys are primarily about survival and kinship, not romance.

This book was pretty dark, but it did portray a fairly likely scenario for the play by play of overthrowing a government. Finnick and Annie’s storyline was one of my most nagging regrets about this. This is the price Suzanne Collins’ readers pay for such great world building, such honest characterisations, such realism. The world just isn’t built for happy endings.

So…. a realistic, if uncomfortable, end to a rather unusual series.

4 thoughts on “Book Review: Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

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